Evidence Corner

Mentored versus not-mentored, what’s the difference?:  Group comparisons made easy

Mentored versus not-mentored, what’s the difference?: Group comparisons made easy

By Adar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, University of Haifa Are there differences in outcomes between youth who are mentored versus those who are not? What about youth who are in a group mentoring intervention versus those in one-on-one mentoring intervention? Do the mentored youth from single-parent homes benefit more from a particular program than those […]

What is peer review and why do we need it?

What is peer review and why do we need it?

By Adar Ben-Eliyahu, Ph.D. Assistant Professor at University of Haifa Peer review refers to a process used for evaluating published academic work, grant proposals, etc. You may think of this process as similar to that of a teacher looking over their students’ work, except that, instead of teachers and students, it is expert colleagues. Who are […]

Smoothing bumps in the road: Research uses attachment theory to improve mentoring practice

Smoothing bumps in the road: Research uses attachment theory to improve mentoring practice

Zilberstein, K. & Spencer, R. (2017). Breaking bad: An attachment perspective on youth mentoring relationship closures. Child & Family Social Work, 22(1), 67-76. doi:10.1111/cfs.12197 Summarized by Justin Preston   In a recent republication, the journal Child & Family Social Work highlighted an article with some useful lessons for mentoring programs looking to find ways of […]

How mentoring can bridge cultural divides

How mentoring can bridge cultural divides

Prietro-Flores, Ò., Feu, J., & Casademont, X. (2016). Assessing intercultural competence as a result of internationalization at home efforts: A case study from the nightingale mentoring program. Journal of Studies in International Education, 20 (5), 437-453. DOI: 10.1177/1028315316662977   Summarized by Vera van den Berg   Dr. Oscar Prietro-Flores Background: With the world becoming increasingly […]

National Mentoring Resource Center: Mentoring for youth with mental health challenges
By December 20, 2016 1 Comments Read More →

National Mentoring Resource Center: Mentoring for youth with mental health challenges

Written by Michael Garringer The National Mentoring Resource Center is happy to announce the release of another entry in our series of evidence reviews on mentoring specific populations of youth. We recently posted Mentoring for Youth with Mental Health Challenges, authored by Dr. Michelle Munson and her colleague James Railey at New York University. Dr. […]

Do Mentees Just Wanna Have Fun?

Do Mentees Just Wanna Have Fun?

by David DuBois Much of my research has been focused on examining the ways in which mentoring, if infused with more intentional and active forms of guidance, can be more effective. Illustratively, in a recent meta-analysis of youth mentoring program evaluations that I conducted with several colleagues (including Jean Rhodes, the editor of the Chronicle), […]

Using Evidence To Do the Most Good, Even When it Reveals an “Inconvenient Truth”
By January 11, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Using Evidence To Do the Most Good, Even When it Reveals an “Inconvenient Truth”

By Patrick T. McCarthy (reposted W.T. Grant Foundation) Our supply of evidence about What Works, though still too small, is beginning to grow. I want to focus here on how we use evidence—how we put it to work to help more of our nation’s children and families achieve their full potential. Let’s focus on two important […]

How Does Mentoring Benefit Youth? Let’s Count the Ways

How Does Mentoring Benefit Youth? Let’s Count the Ways

by David DuBois One of the most common frustrations I have heard voiced by folks in practice and advocacy roles within our field is that the measures used in evaluations of programs do not seem adequate to the task of capturing the benefits that high-quality mentoring can offer to young people. It is tempting for […]

Empathy adds “powerful, positive spark” to philanthropic giving
By December 6, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

Empathy adds “powerful, positive spark” to philanthropic giving

Editor’s Note: In a recent NYTimes opinion piece, Jamil Zaki, an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University, argues that, although some forms of philanthropy may affect more lives than others, philanthropy based purely on rational decision making will be neither sustained nor beneficial to the donor if it doesn’t connect to the donor at an emotional level. She critiques […]

On sparks, purpose, and natural mentors
By November 13, 2015 0 Comments Read More →

On sparks, purpose, and natural mentors

Reflections on Natural Mentoring Conference by Peter Samuelson, Director, Research & Evaluation, Thrive Foundation If we want to increase the number of caring adults in the lives of youth, where might they be found? In the mentoring field, the metaphor of “fishing” has been used to illustrate mentoring. To increase the presence of caring adults […]