Author Archive: Jean Rhodes

rss feed

Author's Website →

New Book “Teach to Work” seeks to bridge education-business gap through mentoring
By February 10, 2017 0 Comments Read More →

New Book “Teach to Work” seeks to bridge education-business gap through mentoring

by Patty Alper Mentoring transforms lives. I have learned this firsthand through the eyes of six hundred inner city students I have had the privilege of mentoring over the last fifteen years. In Teach to Work, I will show how you can improve the lives of high school, community college, or university students, while simultaneously […]

Profiles in Mentoring: A conversation with Jean Rhodes and Audrey Wittrup
By February 9, 2017 0 Comments Read More →

Profiles in Mentoring: A conversation with Jean Rhodes and Audrey Wittrup

Written by Justin Preston The following is an excerpted conversation held with Jean Rhodes, Ph.D., and her daughter, Audrey Wittrup, M.A.. Jean is the Frank L. Boyden Professor of Psychology at UMass Boston and Director of the Center for Evidence-Based Mentoring. Audrey is a doctoral student in clinical psychology at the University of Virginia. Audrey […]

Mentoring by the numbers: Some surprising trends in volunteer efforts
By January 23, 2017 1 Comments Read More →

Mentoring by the numbers: Some surprising trends in volunteer efforts

By Jean Rhodes and Elizabeth Raposa Let’s start with a pop quiz. Here goes: How many American adults, aged 18 and older served as volunteer mentors in 2015? And, #2, how have these numbers changed over the past decade? Take a few minutes to think these questions over? Ok, ready for the answer? Drawing from […]

Posted in: Editors Blog
From poetry to justice: Mentors as partners in youth’s critical awareness and activism
By January 18, 2017 1 Comments Read More →

From poetry to justice: Mentors as partners in youth’s critical awareness and activism

by Jean Rhodes Sixteen-year old Kayla Harris loves poetry. She pens verses in the margins of her notebooks during class, fine tuning them on the bus as it rattles from her public school in Boston’s West Roxbury neighborhood to her grandmother’s apartment in nearby Mattapan. She composes them in her head each night, tuning out […]

Posted in: Editors Blog
Want to help more children in 2017? Stop being so empathic!
By January 4, 2017 2 Comments Read More →

Want to help more children in 2017? Stop being so empathic!

By Jean Rhodes Most fund-raising events for mentoring programs follow a familiar script. After the mingling and announcements, a mentor and mentee are beckoned to the podium. The mentor describes in poignant detail the many stressors in her mentee’s life; the mentee expresses gratitude for the loving support and guidance she received. By the time the […]

Posted in: Editors Blog
The 5 most popular Chronicle posts of 2016
By December 19, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

The 5 most popular Chronicle posts of 2016

by Jean Rhodes The Chronicle of Evidence-Based Mentoring was launched in September, 2012, making 2016 its fourth full year of operations.  Since its launch, we have posted over 1,000 article summaries, forums, profiles, and news articles, attracting over a million page views from our 7,000 subscribers and tens of thousands of visitors each month.   All of this is to say, thank […]

Mentoring’s Promise and Limits
By December 15, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Mentoring’s Promise and Limits

By Larry Gordon Editor’s Note: This article appeared recently in the Atlantic. Research on the long-term effects of advisers is mixed, and some programs are now relying on video-game networks and other technology to forge stronger relationships. Fred Thornhill / Reuters When Leo Hall was 8 years old, his mother sent him to a tutoring […]

The “warm-glow” theory of giving to others: Implications for mentoring programs
By December 14, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

The “warm-glow” theory of giving to others: Implications for mentoring programs

by Jean Rhodes Why do people give their precious time and resources to strangers? Is it pure altruism or are there other motivational forces at work? This is an intriguing question that has implications for our efforts to encourage volunteerism and charitable donations. Fortunately, a growing number of scholars have focused on non-profit organizations as an […]

Posted in: Editors Blog
Empathic teacher-student connections lead to better student behavior
By December 9, 2016 Read More →

Empathic teacher-student connections lead to better student behavior

By Emily Underwood, ScienceMag School suspension rates have nearly tripled in the United States since the 1970s, rising from just 3.7% of all students in 1974 to nearly 11% in 2011. That’s a big deal because missed class means missed learning, and suspensions can predict future unemployment and even incarceration. Now, a new study suggests […]

Wisdom from Carola Suárez-Orozco
By November 27, 2016 0 Comments Read More →

Wisdom from Carola Suárez-Orozco

Editor’s Note: A version of this appeared a few months ago but the topic seems particularly relevant these days. With this in mind, here’s a shortened version Hope it’s helpful! by Jean Rhodes Carola Suárez-Orozco, Professor of Human Development and Psychology at UCLA. Carola is well equipped to tackle this issue. She is co-author of “Transitions: […]